Women Still Want Annual Mammograms

From Drugs.com - November 21, 2017

Women Still Want Annual Mammograms

TUESDAY, Nov. 21, 2017 -- Most American women would prefer to get a mammogram to screen for breast cancer every year rather than every two years, a new study finds.

Currently, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends that women at average risk for breast cancer be screened every two years, beginning at age 50.

The recommendation is based in part on potential harms associated with screening mammography. Those include diagnosis and treatment of noninvasive and invasive breast cancers that would not have posed a threat to a woman's health, as well as unneeded biopsies and the anxiety caused by false-positive results.

However, other experts believe that the benefits of early breast cancer detection far outweigh the potential harms.

To get women's views, the researchers surveyed 731 women, 59 years old on average, who had screening and diagnostic mammograms done at Einstein Medical Center in Philadelphia between December 2016 and February 2017.

The investigators found that 71 percent of the women said they'd prefer a screening mammogram every year. Those with a family history of breast cancer and a prior breast biopsy were more likely to be in favor of yearly screening.

The findings are to be presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America, held Nov. 26 to Dec. 1 in Chicago. Research presented at meetings should be considered preliminary until published in a peer-reviewed medical journal.

Continue reading at Drugs.com »